vhs

Since 2007, the University of Minnesota has been a leader in Viral Hemorrhagic Septicemia virus research and outreach efforts, focused on early detection and prevention. Click here to learn more about VHS and its impacts.

Key findings and accomplishments

  • Developed a new diagnostic assay that is 1,000 times more sensitive, lowered turn-around time from 28 days to 4 hours, and reduced cost by 40% compared to the previous test
  • Annually sampled about 35 high-priority bodies of water for early detection
  • Created and offered training programs for veterinarians, aquaculture producers, and field biologists to effectively identify and respond to a VHS outbreak
  • Developed risk management recommendations that have been implemented by the Minnesota DNR to prevent the introduction and spread of VHS
  • Used predictive suitability models to show that conditions in the Great Lakes, and much of Minnesota, are still at risk for an outbreak of VHS

Current efforts

Since 2007, the University of Minnesota has been a leader in Viral Hemorrhagic Septicemia virus research and outreach efforts focused on early detection and prevention. The results from this work have better prepared Minnesota to rapidly respond and limit the spread of this potentially devastating disease. Current efforts have shifted gears to focus more broadly on fish health threats of emerging concern, including: novel pathogen discovery, investigation of fish kill events, and the pathways of infectious agent spread. These areas of research have broad impacts to understanding and managing other aquatic invasive species and overall health of the state's aquatic ecosystem.

vhs

Researchers